Amazing Books
Temporary Blank

Friday, April 22, 2011

Database Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications






Contents
Volume I
Section I. Fundamental Concepts and Theories
This section serves as the foundation for this exhaustive reference tool by addressing crucial theories
essential to the understanding of database technologies. Chapters found within these pages provide
an excellent framework in which to position database technologies within the field of information sci-
ence and technology. Individual contributions provide overviews of data warehousing and database
management systems, while also exploring critical stumbling blocks of this field. Within this introduc-
tory section, the reader can learn and choose from a compendium of expert research on the elemental
theories underscoring the research and application of database technologies.
Chapter 1.1. Philosophical Foundations of Information Modeling ........................................................ 1
John M. Artz, The George Washington University, USA
Chapter 1.2. A Generalized Comparison of Open Source and Commercial Database Management
Systems ................................................................................................................................................. 13
Theodoros Evdoridis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Theodoros Tzouramanis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 1.3. Highly Available Database Management Systems........................................................... 28
Wenbing Zhao, Cleveland State University, USA
Chapter 1.4. Mining in Music Databases.............................................................................................. 35
Ioannis Karydis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Alexandros Nanopoulos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Yannis Manolopoulos, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Chapter 1.5. Pattern Mining and Clustering on Image Databases ........................................................ 60
Marinette Bouet, LIMOS, Blaise Pascal University-Clermont-Ferrand, France
Pierre Gançarski, LSIIT-AFD-Louis Pasteur University, France
Marie-Aude Aufaure, Supélec—INRIA, France
Omar Boussaïd, University LUMIERE Lyon, France
Chapter 1.6. Conceptual Modeling Solutions for the Data Warehouse ................................................ 86
Stefano Rizzi, DEIS-University of Bologna, Italy
Chapter 1.7. A Literature Overview of Fuzzy Database Modeling..................................................... 105
Z. M. Ma, Northeastern University, China
Chapter 1.8. Fuzzy and Probabilistic Object-Oriented Databases...................................................... 126
Tru H. Cao, Ho Chi Minh City University of Technology, Vietnam
Chapter 1.9. An Overview of Fuzzy Approaches to Flexible Database Querying ............................. 135
Slawomir Zadrożny, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
Guy de Tré, Ghent University, Belgium
Rita de Caluwe, Ghent University, Belgium
Janusz Kacprzyk, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
Chapter 1.10. Distributed Data Mining............................................................................................... 157
Grigorios Tsoumakas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Ioannis Vlahavas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Chapter 1.11. Histogram-Based Compression of Databases and Data Cubes .................................... 165
Alfredo Cuzzocrea, University of Calabria, Italy
Chapter 1.12. Emergence Index in Image Databases.......................................................................... 179
Sagarmay Deb, Southern Cross University, Australia
Chapter 1.13. Secure Knowledge Discovery in Databases................................................................. 186
Rick L. Wilson, Oklahoma State University, USA
Peter A. Rosen, University of Evansville, USA
Mohammad Saad Al-Ahmadi, Oklahoma State University, USA
Chapter 1.14. Indexing Textual Information....................................................................................... 196
Ioannis N. Kouris, University of Patras, Greece
Christos Makris, University of Patras, Greece
Evangelos Theodoridis, University of Patras, Greece
Athanasios Tsakalidis, University of Patras, Greece
Chapter 1.15. Database in Computing Systems.................................................................................. 205
W. Brett McKenzie, Roger Williams University, USA
Chapter 1.16. Database Integrity Checking ........................................................................................ 212
Hendrik Decker, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Spain
Davide Martinenghi, Free University of Bozen/Bolzano, Italy
Chapter 1.17. A Survey on Temporal Data Warehousing ................................................................... 221
Matteo Golfarelli, DEIS–University of Bologna, Italy
Stefano Rizzi, DEIS–University of Bologna, Italy
Chapter 1.18. Discovering Quality Knowledge from Relational Databases ...................................... 238
M. Mehdi Owrang O., American University, USA
Chapter 1.19. Approaches to Semantics in Knowledge Management ................................................ 257
Cristiano Fugazza, University of Milan, Italy
Stefano David, Polytechnic University of Marche, Italy
Anna Montesanto, Polytechnic University of Marche, Italy
Cesare Rocchi, Polytechnic University of Marche, Italy
Chapter 1.20. Theories of Meaning in Schema Matching: A Review................................................. 282
Joerg Evermann, Memorial University of Newfoundland - St. John’s, Canada
Chapter 1.21. Multi-Label Classification: An Overview .................................................................... 309
Grigorios Tsoumakas, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Ioannis Katakis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Chapter 1.22. Electronic Usage Statistics ........................................................................................... 320
Patricia Hults, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, USA
Chapter 1.23. Databases Modeling of Engineering Information ........................................................ 338
Z. M. Ma, Northeastern University, China
Chapter 1.24. An Overview of Learning Object Repositories ............................................................ 362
Agiris Tzikopoulos, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece
Nikos Manouselis, Agricultural University of Athens, Greece
Riina Vuorikar, European Schoolnet, Belgium
Chapter 1.25. An Overview of IDS Using Anomaly Detection.......................................................... 384
Lior Rokach, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
Yuval Elovici, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
Chapter 1.26. Towards Google Earth: A History of Earth Geography ............................................... 395
Hatem F. Halaoui, Haigazian University, Lebanon


Section II. Development and Design Methodologies
This section provides in-depth coverage of conceptual architectures, frameworks and methodologies
related to the design and implementation of database technologies. Throughout these contributions,
research fundamentals in the discipline are presented and discussed. From broad examinations to spe-
cific discussions on particular frameworks and infrastructures, the research found within this section
spans the discipline while also offering detailed, specific discussions. Basic designs, as well as abstract
developments, are explained within these chapters, and frameworks for designing successful databases
are discussed.
Chapter 2.1. Design of a Data Model for Social Network Applications............................................. 414
Susanta Mitra, International Institute of Information Technology, India
Aditya Bagchi, Indian Statistical Institute, India
A.K.Bandyopadhyay, Jadavpur University, India
Chapter 2.2. Database Design Based on B ......................................................................................... 440
Elvira Locuratolo, ISTI, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Italy
Chapter 2.3. A Database Service Discovery Model for Mobile Agents.............................................. 457
Lei Song, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
Xining Li, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
Jingbo Ni, University of Guelph, Guelph, Canada
Chapter 2.4. A Database Project in a Small Company (or How the Real World Doesn’t Always
Follow the Book) ................................................................................................................................ 468
Efrem Mallach, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, USA
Chapter 2.5. Integrating Mobile-Based Systems with Healthcare Databases..................................... 484
Yu Jiao, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Ali R. Hurson, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Thomas E. Potok, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Barbara G. Beckerman, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA
Chapter 2.6. A Framework for Efficient Association Rule Mining in XML Data .............................. 505
Ji Zhang, University of Toronto, Canada
Han Liu, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Tok Wang Ling, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Robert M. Bruckner, Microsoft, USA
A Min Tjoa, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
Chapter 2.7. Conceptual Modeling for XML: A Myth or a Reality.................................................... 527
Sriram Mohan, Indiana University, USA
Arijit Sengupta, Wright State University, USA
Chapter 2.8. Semantic Integrity Constraint Checking for Multiple XML Databases......................... 550
Praveen Madiraju, Marquette University, USA
Rajshekhar Sunderraman, Georgia State University, USA
Shamkant B. Navathe, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Haibin Wang, Emory University, USA
Chapter 2.9. Goal-Oriented Requirement Engineering for XML Document Warehouses ................. 570
Vicky Nassis, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia
Tharam S. Dillon, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
Wenny Rahayu, La Trobe University, Australia
R. Rajugan, University of Technology, Sydney, Australia
Chapter 2.10. Mediating RDF/S Queries to Relational and XML Sources ........................................ 596
I. Koffina, Institute of Computer Science & University of Crete, Greece
G. Serfiotis, Institute of Computer Science & University of Crete, Greece
V. Christophides, Institute of Computer Science & University of Crete, Greece
V. Tannen, University of Pennsylvania, USA
Chapter 2.11. A Methodology Supporting the Design and Evaluating the Final Quality
of Data Warehouses ............................................................................................................................ 615
Maurizio Pighin, University of Udine, Italy
Lucio Ieronutti, University of Udine, Italy
Chapter 2.12. An MDA Compliant Approach for Designing Secure Data Warehouses ..................... 637
Rodolfo Villarroel, Universidad Católica del Maule, Chile
Eduardo Fernández-Medina, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
Juan Trujillo, Universidad de Alicante, Spain
Mario Piattini, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Spain
Chapter 2.13. Architecture for Symbolic Object Warehouse.............................................................. 648
Sandra Elizabeth González Císaro, Universidad Nacional del
Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina
Héctor Oscar Nigro, Universidad Nacional del
Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina
Chapter 2.14. Efficient and Robust Node- Partitioned Data Warhouses............................................. 658
Pedro Furtado, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal
Volume II
Chapter 2.15. Web Data Warehousing Convergence: From Schematic to Systematic ....................... 678
D. Xuan Le, La Trobe University, Australia
J. Wenny Rahayu, La Trobe University, Australia
David Taniar, Monash University, Australia
Chapter 2.16. Data Warehouse Design to Support Customer Relationship
Management Analysis......................................................................................................................... 702
Colleen Cunningham, Drexel University, USA
Il-Yeol Song, Drexel University, USA
Peter P. Chen, Louisiana State University, USA
Chapter 2.17. Aspects of Intelligence in an “SP” Database System................................................... 725
J. Gerard Wolff, CognitionResearch.org.uk, UK
Chapter 2.18. Intelligent Search for Experts Using Fuzzy Abstraction Hierarchy
in Knowledge Management Systems.................................................................................................. 755
Kun-Woo Yang, Keimyung University, South Korea
Soon-Young Huh, KAIST Business School, South Korea
Chapter 2.19. Building an Environmental GIS Knowledge Infrastructure......................................... 778
Inya Nlenanya, Iowa State University, USA
Chapter 2.20. Bug Fixing Practices within Free/Libre Open Source Software Development Teams.... 797
Kevin Crowston, Syracuse University, USA
Barbara Scozzi, Politecnico di Bari, Italy
Chapter 2.21. OLAP with a Database Cluster .................................................................................... 829
Uwe Röhm, University of Sydney, Australia
Chapter 2.22. Extraction, Transformation, and Loading Processes.................................................... 847
Jovanka Adzic, Telecom Italia, Italy
Valter Fiore, Telecom Italia, Italy
Luisella Sisto, Telecom Italia, Italy
Chapter 2.23. Designing Information Systems Capabilities to Create Business Value:
A Theoretical Conceptualization of the Role of Flexibility and Integration....................................... 866
Christoph Schlueter Langdon, University of Southern California, USA
Section III. Tools and Technologies
This section presents extensive coverage of the technology that both derives from and informs data-
bases. These chapters provide an in-depth analysis of the use and development of innumerable devices
and tools, while also providing insight into new and upcoming technologies, theories, and instruments
that will soon be commonplace. Within these rigorously researched chapters, readers are presented
with examples of database technology. In addition, the successful implementation and resulting impact
of these various technologies are discussed within this collection of chapters.
Chapter 3.1. Open Source Database Technologies ............................................................................. 887
Emmanuel Udoh, Purdue University, USA
Chapter 3.2. Action Research with Internet Database Tools............................................................... 894
Bruce L. Mann, Memorial University, Canada
Chapter 3.3. A Scalable Middleware for Web Databases.................................................................... 903
Athman Bouguettaya, Virginia Tech, USA
Zaki Malik, Virginia Tech, USA
Abdelmounaam Rezgui, Virginia Tech, USA
Lori Korff, Virginia Tech, USA
Chapter 3.4. Full-Text Search Engines for Databases ........................................................................ 931
László Kovács, University of Miskolc, Hungary
Domonkos Tikk, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
Chapter 3.5. Application of Decision Tree as a Data mining Tool in a Manufacturing System......... 940
S. A. Oke, University of Lagos, Nigeria
Chapter 3.6. Alliance Project: Digital Kinship Database and Genealogy........................................... 956
Shigenobu Sugito, Sugiyama University, Japan
Sachiko Kubota, Hiroshima University, Japan
Chapter 3.7. Constraint-Based Multi-Dimensional Databases ........................................................... 961
Franck Ravat, Université Toulouse I, France
Olivier Teste, Université Toulouse III, France
Gilles Zurfluh, Université Toulouse I, France
Chapter 3.8. Towards a Visual Query System for Spatio-Temporal Databases.................................. 987
Valéria M. B. Cavalcanti, Federal University of Campina Grande, Brazil
Ulrich Schiel, Federal University of Campina Grande, Brazil
Claudio de Souza Baptista, Federal University of Campina Grande, Brazil
Chapter 3.9. Visual Query Languages, Representation Techniques and Data Models ..................... 1003
Maria Chiara Caschera, IRPPS-CNR, Italy
Arianna D’Ulizia, IRPPS-CNR, Italy
Leonardo Tininini, IASI-CNR, Italy
Chapter 3.10. A Formal Verification and Validation Approach for Real-Time Databases................ 1020
Pedro Fernandes Ribeiro Neto, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil
Maria Lígia Barbosa Perkusich, Universidade Católica de Pernambuco, Brazil
Hyggo Oliveira de Almeida, Federal University of Campina Grande, Brazil
Angelo Perkusich, Federal University of Campina Grande, Brazil
Chapter 3.11. Protoforms of Linguistic Database Summaries as a Human Consistent Tool
for Using Natural Language in Data Mining .................................................................................... 1038
Janusz Kacprzyk, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
Sławomir Zadrożny, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
Chapter 3.12. Rapid Privacy Preserving Algorithm for Large Databases ........................................ 1050
K. Anbumani, Karunya Institute of Technology and Sciences (Deemed University), India
R. Nedunchezhian, Sri Ramakrishna Engineering College, India
Chapter 3.13. A Content-Based Approach to Medical Image Database Retrieval............................ 1062
Chia-Hung Wei, University of Warwick, UK
Chang-Tsun Li, University of Warwick, UK
Roland Wilson, University of Warwick, UK
Chapter 3.14. High Speed Optical Higher Order Neural Networks for Discovering
Data Trends and Patterns in Very Large Databases .......................................................................... 1084
David R. Selviah, University College London, UK
Chapter 3.15. Mobile Information Processing Involving Multiple Non-Collaborative Sources...... 1108
Say Ying Lim, Monash University, Australia
David Taniar, Monash University, Australia
Bala Srinivasan, Monash University, Australia
Chapter 3.16. Rough Sets: A Versatile Theory for Approaches to Uncertainty Management
in Databases ...................................................................................................................................... 1127
Theresa Beaubouef, Southeastern Louisiana University, USA
Frederick E. Petry, Naval Research Laboratory, USA
Chapter 3.17. VRMiner: A Tool for Multimedia Database Mining With Virtual Reality................. 1151
H. Azzag, Université François-Rabelais de Tours,
Laboratoire d‘Informatique (EA 2101), France
F. Picarougne, Université François-Rabelais de Tours,
Laboratoire d‘Informatique (EA 2101), France
C. Guinot, CE.R.I.E.S., Unité Biométrie et Epidémiologie,
and Université François-Rabelais de Tours,
Laboratoire d‘Informatique (EA 2101), France
G. Venturini, Université François-Rabelais de Tours,
Laboratoire d‘Informatique (EA 2101), France
Chapter 3.18. UB2SQL: A Tool for Building Database Applications Using UML
and B Formal Method ....................................................................................................................... 1168
Amel Mammar, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg
Régine Laleau, University of Paris 12, France
Chapter 3.19. MMIR: An Advanced Content-Based Image Retrieval System Using
a Hierarchical Learning Framework ................................................................................................. 1189
Min Chen, Florida International University, USA
Shu-Ching Chen, Florida International University, USA
Chapter 3.20. MILPRIT*: A Constraint-Based Algorithm for Mining Temporal
Relational Patterns ............................................................................................................................ 1205
Sandra de Amo, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil
Waldecir P. Junior, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Brazil
Arnaud Giacometti, Université François Rabelais de Tours, France
Chapter 3.21. Database Benchmarks ................................................................................................ 1226
Jérôme Darmont, ERIC, University of Lyon 2, France
Section IV. Utilization and Application
This section introduces and discusses the ways in which information technology has been used to shape
the realm of database technology and proposes new ways in which IT-related innovations can be imple-
mented within organizations and in society as a whole. These particular selections highlight, among
other topics, the implementation of mobile databases and database-driven portals. Contributions in-
cluded in this section provide excellent coverage of today’s environment and insight into how database
technology impacts the fabric of our present-day global village.
Chapter 4.1. A Taxonomy of Database Operations on Mobile Devices ........................................... 1235
Say Ying Lim, Monash University, Australia
David Taniar, Monash University, Australia
Bala Srinivasan, Monash University, Australia
Chapter 4.2. Transaction Management in Mobile Databases ........................................................... 1257
Ziyad Tariq Abdul-Mehdi, Multimedia University, Malaysia
Ali Bin Mamat, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia
Hamidah Ibrahim, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Malaysia
Mustafa M. Dirs, College University Technology Tun Hussein Onn, Malaysia
Chapter 4.3. Bioinformatics Web Portals.......................................................................................... 1267
Mario Cannataro, Università “Magna Græcia” di Catanzaro, Italy
Pierangelo Veltri, Università “Magna Græcia” di Catanzaro, Italy
Chapter 4.4. Large-Scale ASP Replication of Database-Driven Portals........................................... 1276
Christopher B. Mayer, Air Force Institute of Technology, USA
K. Selçuk Candan, Arizona State University, USA
Chapter 4.5. A Case Study of an Integrated University Portal.......................................................... 1285
Tracy R. Stewart, Regent University, USA
Jason D. Baker, Regent University, USA
Chapter 4.6. Electronic Tools for Online Assessments: An Illustrative Case Study
from Teacher Education .................................................................................................................... 1291
Jon Margerum-Leys, Eastern Michigan University, USA
Kristin M. Bass, University of California, Berkeley, USA
Chapter 4.7. Assessment of Students by a Teacher with a Hand Held Device
and a Networkable Database............................................................................................................. 1309
C. Paul Newhouse, Edith Cowan University, Australia
Chapter 4.8. An XML-Based Database for Knowledge Discovery: Definition
and Implementation .......................................................................................................................... 1320
Rosa Meo, Università di Torino, Italy
Giuseppe Psaila, Università di Bergamo, Italy
Chapter 4.9. A Prehospital Database System for Emergency Medical Services............................... 1344
Nada Hashmi, 10Blade, Inc., USA
Mark Gaynor, Boston University School of Management, USA
Marissa Pepe, Boston University School of Management, USA
Matt Welsh, Harvard University, USA
William W. Tollefsen, Boston University School of Medicine, USA
Steven Moulton, Boston University School of Medicine, USA
Dan Myung, 10Blade, Inc., USA
Volume III
Chapter 4.10. A Preliminary Study Toward Wireless Integration of Patient Information System ... 1357
Abdul-Rahman Al-Ali, American University of Sharjah, UAE
Tarik Ozkul, American University of Sharjah, UAE
Taha Landolsi, American University of Sharjah, UAE
Chapter 4.11. A Web-Based Application to Exchange Electronic Health Records
and Medical Images in Ophthalmology............................................................................................ 1372
Isabel de la Torre Díez, University of Valladolid, Spain
Roberto Hornero Sánchez, University of Valladolid, Spain
Miguel López Coronado, University of Valladolid, Spain
Jesús Poza Crespo, University of Valladolid, Spain
María Isabel López Gálvez, University of Valladolid, Spain
Chapter 4.12. Implementation of a Computerized System in an Oncology Unit ............................. 1385
Taxiarchis Botsis, Athens Medical School, Greece
Konstantinos Syrigos, Athens Medical School, Greece
Chapter 4.13. Challenges in Data Mining on Medical Databases .................................................... 1393
Fatemeh Hosseinkhah, Howard University Hospital, USA
Hassan Ashktorab, Howard University Hospital, USA
Ranjit Veen, American University, USA
M. Mehdi Owrang O., American University, USA
Chapter 4.14. Beyond OpenURL: Technologies for Linking Library Resources............................. 1405
George Boston, Western Michigan University, USA
Randle J. Gedeon, Western Michigan University, USA
Chapter 4.15. Databases for Multiple Archaeological Excavations and Internet Applications ........ 1420
Athanasios Karamalis, Computer Scientist and Researcher, Germany
Chapter 4.16. Collaborative Information Management System for Science Domains..................... 1446
Ozgul Unal, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Ersin C. Kaletas, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Hamideh Afsarmanesh, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
H. Hakan Yakali, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Louis O. Hertzberger, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Chapter 4.17. Computer Networking of Cybercafés in Delta State, Nigeria.................................... 1454
Oghenevwogaga Benson Adogbeji, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria
Esharenana E. Adomi, Delta State University, Abraka, Nigeria
Chapter 4.18. Ara Irititja: Towards Culturally Appropriate IT Best Practice
in Remote Indigenous Australia........................................................................................................ 1462
Martin Hughes, Smart Works, Australia
John Dallwitz, Ara Irititja, Pitjantjatjara Council Inc., Australia
Chapter 4.19. Agreements Treaties and Negotiated Settlements Database ...................................... 1472
Marcia Langton, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Odette Mazel, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Lisa Palmer, The University of Melbourne, Australia
Chapter 4.20. From ‘Flow’ to ‘Database’: A Comparative Study of the Uses
of Traditional and Internet Television in Estonia.............................................................................. 1477
Ravio Suni, University of Tartu, Estonia
Chapter 4.21. Innovative Technological Paradigms for Corporate Offshoring ................................ 1490
Tapasya Patki, GGSIP University, India
A. B. Patki, Department of Information Technology, India
Chapter 4.22. Out of Control? The Real ID Act of 2005 .................................................................. 1511
Todd Loendorf, North Carolina State University, USA
Chapter 4.23. Factors Influencing the Lifetime of Telecommunication and Information
Technology Standards: Results of an Explorative Analysis of the PERINORM Database .............. 1529
Knut Blind, Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research
& Berlin University of Technology, Germany
Chapter 4.24. Image Mining: A Case for Clustering Shoe prints ..................................................... 1552
Wei Sun, Monash University, Australia
David Taniar, Monash University, Australia
Torab Torabi, La Trobe University, Australia
Chapter 4.25. A Data Visualization and Interpretation System for Sensor Networks ...................... 1568
Fengxian Fan, Kunming University, China
Chapter 4.26. Enhancing UML Models: A Domain Analysis Approach .......................................... 1581
Iris Reinhartz-Berger, University of Haifa, Israel
Arnon Sturm, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel
Section V. Organizational and Social Implications
This section includes a wide range of research pertaining to the social and organizational impact of da-
tabase technology around the world. Chapters in this section analyze online databases, data security,
and organizational decision support. The inquiries and methods presented in this section offer insight
into the implications of database technology at both a personal and organizational level, while also
emphasizing potential areas of study within the discipline.
Chapter 5.1. A Knowledge Integration Approach for Organizational Decision Support.................. 1604
Kee-Young Kwahk, Kookmin University, Korea
Hee-Woong Kim, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Hock Chuan Chan, National University of Singapore, Singapore
Chapter 5.2. The Knowledge Transfer Process: From Field Studies to Technology
Development ..................................................................................................................................... 1622
M. Millie Kwan, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
Pak-Keung Cheung, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong
Chapter 5.3. The Critical Role of Information Processing in Creating an Effective
Knowledge Organization ................................................................................................................. 1638
William R. King, University of Pittsburgh, USA
Chapter 5.4. Interesting Knowledge Patterns in Databases .............................................................. 1652
Rajesh Natarajan, Indian Institute of Management Lucknow (IIML), India
B. Shekar, Indian Institute of Management Bangalore (IIMB), India
Chapter 5.5. Fine-Grained Data Security in Virtual Organizations .................................................. 1663
Harith Indraratne, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
Gábor Hosszú, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Hungary
Chapter 5.6. Knowledge Communication with Shared Databases ................................................... 1670
Joachim Kimmerle, University of Tuebingen, Germany
Ulrike Cress, Knowledge Media Research Center, Germany
Chapter 5.7. Economic Development: Government’s Cutting Edge in IT ....................................... 1682
Gerald A. Merwin Jr., Valdosta State University, USA
J. Scott McDonald, University of Texas El Paso, USA
Levy C. Odera, University of Florida, USA
Chapter 5.8. A Comprehensive Framework Towards Information Sharing Between
Government Agencies....................................................................................................................... 1723
Akhilesh Bajaj, The University of Tulsa, USA
Sudha Ram, The University of Arizona, USA
Chapter 5.9. A GIS-Based Interactive Database System for Planning Purposes .............................. 1741
Nedal Al-Hanbali, Al-Balqa’ Applied University, Jordan
Balqies Sadoun, Al-Balqa’ Applied University, Jordan
Chapter 5.10. Categorizing Post-Deployment IT Changes: An Empirical Investigation ................. 1756
David Kang, Chapman University, USA
Chapter 5.11. Customer Relationship Management and Knowledge Discovery in Database.......... 1778
Jounghae Bang, Kookmin University, Korea
Nikhilesh Dholakia, University of Rhode Island, USA
Lutz Hamel, University of Rhode Island, USA
Seung-Kyoon Shin, University of Rhode Island, USA
Chapter 5.12. Customer Investigation Process at Credit Suisse: Meeting the
Rising Demands of Regulators ......................................................................................................... 1787
Daniel Maier, Credit Suisse, Switzerland
Thomas Muegeli, Credit Suisse, Switzerland
Andrea Krejza, Credit Suisse, Switzerland
Chapter 5.13. Metaphors and Models for Data Mining Ethics ......................................................... 1808
Peter Danielson, University of British Columbia, Canada
Chapter 5.14. Reconciling Information Privacy and Information Access in a
Globalized Technology Society ........................................................................................................ 1823
George T. Duncan, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Stephen F. Roehrig, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Chapter 5.15. Context-Aware Query Processing in Ad-Hoc Environments of Peers ....................... 1844
Nikolaos Folinas, University of Ioannina, Greece
Panos Vassiliadis, University of Ioannina, Greece
Evaggelia Pitoura, University of Ioannina, Greece
Evangelos Papapetrou, University of Ioannina, Greece
Apostolos Zarras, University of Ioannina, Greece
Chapter 5.16. Misuse of Online Databases for Literature Searches ................................................. 1867
Robert A. Bartsch, University of Houston - Clear Lake, USA
Section VI. Managerial Impact
This section presents contemporary coverage of the managerial implications of database technology.
Particular contributions address e-services, database grids, and project databases. The managerial
research provided in this section allows executives, practitioners, and researchers to gain a better sense
of how database technology can inform their practices and behavior.
Chapter 6.1. Conflicts, Compromises, and Political Decisions: Methodological
Challenges of Enterprise-Wide E-Business Architecture Creation................................................... 1876
Kari Smolander, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland
Matti Rossi, Helsinki School of Economics, Finland
Chapter 6.2. Database High Availability: An Extended Survey ....................................................... 1899
Moh’d A. Radaideh, Abu Dhabi Police – Ministry of Interior, United Arab Emirates
Hayder Al-Ameed, United Arab Emirates University, United Arab Emirates
Chapter 6.3. Database Integration in the Grid Infrastructure............................................................ 1928
Emmanuel Udoh, Indiana University – Purdue University, USA
Chapter 6.4. Empirical Assessment of Factors Influencing Success of Enterprise
Resource Planning Implementations................................................................................................. 1936
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Zahidul Islam, Independent University, Bangladesh
Mathew Tan, Agilent Technologies, Malaysia
Chapter 6.5. Business Information Integration from XML and Relational Databases Sources ....... 1959
Ana María Fermoso Garcia, Pontifical University of Salamanca, Spain
Roberto Berjón Gallinas, Pontifical University of Salamanca, Spain
Chapter 6.6. A Parallel Methodology for Reduction of Coupling in Distributed
Business-to-Business E-Commerce Transactions............................................................................. 1984
Anthony Mark Orme, Athens State University, USA
Letha H. Etzkorn, University of Alabama, USA
Chapter 6.7. A Two-Stage Zone Regression Method for Global Characterization
of a Project Database ........................................................................................................................ 2000
J. J. Dolado, University of the Basque Country, Spain
D. Rodríguez, University of Reading, UK
J. Riquelme, University of Seville, Spain
F. Ferrer-Troyano, University of Seville, Spain
J. J. Cuadrado, University of Alcalá de Henares, Spain
Volume IV
Section VII. Critical Issues
This section addresses conceptual and theoretical issues related to the field of database technology,
which include security issues in numerous facets of the discipline including security within medical
and web-powered. Within these chapters, the reader is presented with analysis of the most current and
relevant conceptual inquires within this growing field of study. Particular chapters also address quality
of service issues in information quality, data cleaning, and data classification. Overall, contributions
within this section ask unique, often theoretical questions related to the study of database technology
and, more often than not, conclude that solutions are both numerous and contradictory.
Chapter 7.1. NetCube: Fast, Approximate Database Queries Using Bayesian Networks ................ 2011
Dimitris Margaritis, Iowa State University, USA
Christos Faloutsos, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Sebastian Thrun, Stanford University, USA
Chapter 7.2. Approximate Range Querying over Sliding Windows................................................. 2037
Francesco Buccafurri, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Italy
Gianluca Caminiti, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Italy
Gianluca Lax, University “Mediterranea” of Reggio Calabria, Italy
Chapter 7.3. Consistent Queries over Databases with Integrity Constraints .................................... 2051
Luciano Caroprese, DEIS Universitá della Calabria, Italy
Cristian Molinaro, DEIS Universitá della Calabria, Italy
Irina Trubitsyna, DEIS Universitá della Calabria, Italy
Ester Zumpano, DEIS Universitá della Calabria, Italy
Chapter 7.4. A Deterministic Approach to XML Query Processing with Efficient Support
for Pure and Negated Containments ................................................................................................. 2059
Dunren Che, Illinois University at Carbondale, USA
Chapter 7.5. Countermeasures for Protecting Legally Sensitive Web-Powered Databases
and Web Portals ................................................................................................................................ 2079
Theodoros Evdoridis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Theodoros Tzouramanis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 7.6. Compiling Medical Data into National Medical Databases:
Legitimate Practice or Data Protection Concern?............................................................................. 2085
Boštjan Berčič, Institute for Economics, Law and Informatics, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Carlisle George, Middlesex University, UK
Chapter 7.7. Database Security and Statistical Database Security ................................................... 2100
Edgar R. Weippl, Secure Business Austria, Austria
Chapter 7.8. Security Threats in Web-Powered Databases and Web Portals.................................... 2109
Theodoros Evdoridis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Theodoros Tzouramanis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 7.9. SQL Code Poisoning: The Most Prevalent Technique for Attacking
Web Powered Databases ................................................................................................................... 2118
Theodoros Tzouramanis, University of the Aegean, Greece
Chapter 7.10. Sanitization and Anonymization of Document Repositories ..................................... 2129
Yücel Saygin, Sabanci University, Turkey
Dilek Hakkani-Tür, AT&T Labs—Research, USA
Gökhan Tür, AT&T Labs—Research, USA
Chapter 7.11. Information Quality: How Good are Off-the-shelf DBMs? ....................................... 2140
Felix Naumann, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany
Mary Roth, IBM Silicon Valley Lab, USA
Chapter 7.12. Handling Fuzzy Similarity for Data Classification .................................................... 2157
Roy Gelbard, Bar-Ilan University, Israel
Avichai Meged, Bar-Ilan University, Israel
Chapter 7.13. Fabric Database and Fuzzy Logic Models for Evaluating Fabric Performance ........ 2166
Yan Chen, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, USA
Graham H. Rong, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA
Jianhua Chen, Louisiana State University, USA
Chapter 7.14. Mining for Mutually Exclusive Items in Transaction Databases ............................... 2192
George Tzanis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Christos Berberidis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece
Chapter 7.15. Ensuring Correctness, Completeness, and Freshness
for Outsourced Tree-Indexed Data.................................................................................................... 2204
Tran Khanh Dang, National University of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Chapter 7.16. A Multiple-Bits Watermark for Relational Data......................................................... 2223
Yingjiu Li, Singapore Management University, Singapore
Huiping Guo, California State University at Los Angeles, USA
Shuhong Wang, University of Wollongong, Australia
Chapter 7.17. A Machine Learning Approach to Data Cleaning in Databases
and Data Warehouses ........................................................................................................................ 2245
Hamid Haidarian Shahri, University of Maryland, USA
Chapter 7.18. A Roadmap on Updates .............................................................................................. 2261
Fernando Zacarías Flores, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico
Dionicio Zacarías Flores, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico
Rosalba Cuapa Canto, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico
Luis Miguel Guzmán Muñoz, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Mexico
Chapter 7.19. Association Rule Hiding Methods.............................................................................. 2268
Vassilios S. Verykios, University of Thessaly, Greece
Chapter 7.20. Managing Uncertainties in Image Databases ............................................................. 2275
Antonio Picariello, University of Napoli, Italy
Maria Luisa Sapino, University of Torino, Italy
Chapter 7.21. Bitmap Join Indexes vs. Data Partitioning ................................................................. 2292
Ladjel Bellatreche, Poitiers University, France
Chapter 7.22. Integrating Projects from Multiple Open Source Code Forges.................................. 2301
Megan Squire, Elon University, USA
Chapter 7.23. Extended Action Rule Discovery Based on Single Classification Rules
and Reducts....................................................................................................................................... 2313
Zbigniew W. Ras, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, USA
Elzbieta M. Wyrzykowska, University of Information Technology and Management, Poland
Chapter 7.24. Optimization of Multidimensional Aggregates in Data Warehouses ......................... 2324
Russel Pears, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Bryan Houliston, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
Chapter 7.25. Improving Storage Concepts for Semantic Models and Ontologies .......................... 2348
Edgar R. Weippl, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
Markus D. Klemen, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
Stefan Raffeiner, Vienna University of Technology, Austria
Section VIII. Emerging Trends
This section highlights research potential within the field of database technology while exploring un-
charted areas of study for the advancement of the discipline. Chapters within this section highlight evo-
lutions in knowledge discovery, data integration, and models that inform database technology. These
contributions, which conclude this exhaustive, multi-volume set, provide emerging trends and sugges-
tions for future research within this rapidly expanding discipline.
Chapter 8.1. From Databases to Ontologies ..................................................................................... 2360
Guntis Barzdins, University of Latvia, Latvia
Janis Barzdins, University of Latvia, Latvia
Karlis Cerans, University of Latvia, Latvia
Chapter 8.2. A Measurement Ontology Generalizable for Emerging Domain Applications
on the Semantic Web......................................................................................................................... 2384
Henry M. Kim, York University, Canada
Arijit Sengupta, Wright State University, USA
Mark S. Fox, University of Toronto, Canada
Mehmet Dalkilic, Indiana University, USA
Chapter 8.3. Enhancing the Process of Knowledge Discovery in Geographic Databases
Using Geo-Ontologies ...................................................................................................................... 2405
Vania Bogorny, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil,
and Transnational University of Limburg, Belgium
Paulo Martins Engel, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil
Luis Otavio Alavares, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Brazil
Chapter 8.4. A Distributed Algorithm for Mining Fuzzy Association Rules
in Traditional Databases.................................................................................................................... 2427
Wai-Ho Au, Microsoft Corporation, USA,
Chapter 8.5. Looking for Information in Fuzzy Relational Databases Accessible Via Web ............ 2448
Carmen Martínez-Cruz, University of Jaén, Spain
Ignacio José Blanco, University of Granada, Spain
M. Amparo Vila, University of Granada, Spain
Chapter 8.6. Integrating Heterogeneous Data Sources in the Web ................................................... 2472
Angelo Brayner, University of Fortaleza, Brazil
Marcelo Meirelles, University of Fortaleza, Brazil
José de Aguiar Moraes Filho, University of Fortaleza, Brazil
Chapter 8.7. Reverse Engineering from an XML Document into an Extended DTD Graph ........... 2489
Herbert Shiu, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Joseph Fong, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong
Chapter 8.8. Evaluating XML-Extended OLAP Queries Based on Physical Algebra ..................... 2510
Xuepeng Yin, Aalborg University, Denmark
Torben Bach Pedersen, Aalborg University, Denmark
Chapter 8.9. Vertical Fragmentation in Databases Using Data-Mining Technique .......................... 2543
Narasimhaiah Gorla, American University of Sharjah, UAE
Pang Wing Yan Betty, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong
Chapter 8.10. Control-Based Database Tuning Under Dynamic Workloads.................................... 2564
Yi-Cheng Tu, University of South Florida, USA
Gang Ding, Olympus Communication Technology of America, Inc., USA
Chapter 8.11. Adoption, Improvement, and Disruption: Predicting the Impact
of Open Source Applications in Enterprise Software Markets ......................................................... 2572
Michael Brydon, Simon Fraser University, Canada
Aidan R. Vining, Simon Fraser University, Canada
Chapter 8.12. 3-D Virtual Worlds in Education: Applications, Benefits, Issues,
and Opportunities.............................................................................................................................. 2595
Brenda Eschenbrenner, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Fiona Fui-Hoon Nah, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Keng Siau, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA
Chapter 8.13. Legal Protection of the Web Page as a Database ....................................................... 2616
Davide Mula, LUISS Guido Carli, Italy
Mirko Luca Lobina, University of Cagliari, Italy
Chapter 8.14. Deterministic Motif Mining in Protein Databases ..................................................... 2632
Pedro Gabriel Ferreira, Universidade do Minho, Portugal
Paulo Jorge Azevedo, Universidade do Minho, Portugal
Chapter 8.15. Mining Allocating Patterns in Investment Portfolios................................................. 2657
Yanbo J. Wang, University of Liverpool, UK
Xinwei Zheng, University of Durham, UK
Frans Coenen, University of Liverpool, UK
Chapter 8.16. Introducing Elasticity for Spatial Knowledge Management ...................................... 2685
David A. Gadish, California State University Los Angeles, USA


Another Database Books
Download

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts with Thumbnails
There was an error in this gadget

Put Your Ads Here!
There was an error in this gadget