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Monday, November 8, 2010

Server Based Java Programming












contents
foreword xv
preface xvii
acknowledgments xxi
about this book xxiii
goals of this book xxix
about the author xxxi
about the cover illustration xxxiii
1 Enterprise Java 1
1.1 Enterprise development 1
What is enterprise development? 1 G Developing the enterprise
application 4 G Reinventing the wheel 7
1.2 Three zeroes 8
Zero development 9 G Zero deployment 11 G Zero administration 12
1.3 Java in the enterprise 14
Sun’s view 14 G Alternate views 14
1.4 Why Java? 15
Criticisms of Java as a server-side language 17
1.5 Summary 25
1.6 Additional reading 26
2 ClassLoaders 27
2.1 Dynamic linking 28
Run-time dynamic loading 28 G Reflection 31
2.2 ClassLoaders: rules and expectations 37
Java .class file format 37 G Using ClassLoader 39
java.lang.ClassLoader 41 G Java name spaces 48
2.3 Java’s built-in ClassLoaders 49
java.security.SecureClassLoader 49 G java.net.URLClassLoader 49
sun.applet.AppletClassLoader 57 G java.rmi.server.RMIClassLoader 57
Bootstrap ClassLoader 57 G sun.misc.Launcher$ExtClassLoader 58
2.4 Summary 58
2.5 Additional reading 59
3 Custom ClassLoaders 61
3.1 Extending ClassLoader 61
FileSystemClassLoader 62 G HashtableClassLoader 66
CompilerClassLoader 67 G StrategyClassLoader and
ClassLoaderStrategy 71 G CompositeClassLoader 75
Other ClassLoader tricks 79 G Other ClassLoaders 80
3.2 On-the-fly code upgrades 80
3.3 GJAS: first steps 85
Goals 85 G Service 86 G Server 88 G ServerManager 90
3.4 Summary 92
4 Extensions 93
4.1 Types of extensions 94
Installed extensions 94 G Building an installed extension 95
Download extensions 96 G Building a download extension 98
4.2 Implications of the extensions mechanism 100
Distributed libraries through download extensions 100
Java EXEs; relation to C++ static linking 101
4.3 Packaging extensions 102
The build-time vs. run-time dilemma 103
4.4 The plug-in 104
The plug-in concept 105 G Enter plug-ins 107 G Marking a .jar file as
a plug-in 110 G PluginClassLoader 111 G Example:
PluginApp 118 G Uses for plug-ins 124
4.5 Summary 125
5 Threads 126
5.1 Why threads? 127
Concurrent processing 127 G Scalability per machine 128
Encapsulation 129 G Design and implementation 130
5.2 Java threads 130
java.lang.Thread and java.lang.Runnable 131 G Starting threads 137
Stopping threads 139 G Daemon threads 142 G Threads and
ClassLoaders 143 G java.lang.ThreadGroup 144
5.3 Thread implementations in Java 146
Green threads 147 G Native threads 147 G Hybrids 147
Implications 148
5.4 Summary 148
5.5 Additional reading 148
6 Threading issues 149
6.1 Synchronization 150
Thread-local storage 152
6.2 Exception-handling with multiple threads 153
6.3 Thread idioms and patterns 158
Client-Dispatcher-Server 158 G Fire-and-forget 159
Active Object 160 G SpinLoop 160
Polling (PeriodicThread) 161 G DelayedFire
(ScheduledThread) 163 G Futures 164
6.4 GJAS 166
Adding thread support to GJAS 167
6.5 Summary 173
6.6 Additional reading 173
7 Control 174
7.1 GJAS 175
Local implementation 175 G Example: HelloService 186
7.2 Testing the LocalServer implementation 187
7.3 ExecService 189
7.4 HelloAgainService 193
ThreadServer 196 G Example: ConsoleControlService 201
8 Remote control 208
8.1 RMI implementation 209
Analysis 217
8.2 Other implementations 218
8.3 Necessary improvements 219
8.4 Additional reading 224
9 Configuration 225
9.1 Java models 225
Interface: ConfigProperty and ConfigProperties 226 G Usage 233
Configuration front ends 235
9.2 Summary 236
10 Sockets 237
10.1 Simple socket services 237
SocketClient 238 G EchoService 243 G TimeService 245
Analysis 246
10.2 Encapsulation and refactoring 247
SocketServer 247 G Example: Echo2Service 254
10.3 Connection and ConnectionManager 255
Example: EchoConnection 262 G Example: HTTPConnection 263
Servlets 272
10.4 Advanced Socket services 273
SocketClassLoader and SocketClassService 273
Concept: RedirectorService 279 G Concept: FilterService 280
Other types 281
10.5 Summary 281
10.6 Additional reading 282
11 Servlets 283
11.1 Relationship to sockets 283
CodeServlet: A filtering servlet 285 G HeaderFooter: a redirecting
servlet 287 G Server-side scripting capabilities 289 G Servlets: Not just
about HTML anymore 290
11.2 Servlets and the n-tier application 292
Separating logic from content 293
11.3 Servlets as a poor man’s RMI 293
Example: RemoteStorageServlet 295 G Concept: poor man’s RMI 297
Concept: SOAP 298
11.4 Summary 298
11.5 Additional reading 298
12 Persistence 300
12.1 Java Serialization 301
Serialization to other places 302 G Security and Serialization 303
Customized Serialization 306 G Serialization and evolution 309
Replacement 313
12.2 Beyond the specification 317
Remote storage of objects 317 G Example: RemoteStorageService and
RemoteStorageClient 318 G Remote construction of objects 323
Example: RemoteObjectFactory 325
12.3 JDBC 330
Transient data, state data, data that Isn’t data 332
Example: JDBCClassLoader 334
12.4 Summary 338
12.5 Additional reading 339
13 Business objects 340
13.1 Modeling data 340
Two-tier Systems vs. n-tier Systems 341 G One-tier systems 341
Two-tier systems 342 G n-tier systems 342 G Benefits of an n-tier
model 343 G Business objects, entity relationships 346 G Example:
employee directory 346 G Business objects layer interface layer 348
13.2 Using the Business Object layer 366
Classic Presentation Code: GUIs 366 G Example: OrgTree 366
Feeling cheated? 370
13.3 Summary 370
13.4 Additional reading 371
14 Business object models 372
14.1 Example: HashtableModel 372
Overview 373 G HashtablePerson, HashtableEmployee,
HashtableManager 374 G HashtableModel: Creating objects 375
HashtableModel: Finding objects 378 G HashtableModel: Removing
objects 379 G Conclusion 379
14.2 Example: RDBMSModel 380
RDBMSModel: Storing Business Objects in an RDBMS 381
Overview 382 G RDBMSPerson, RDBMSEmployee,
RDBMSManager 384 G RDBMSModel: Creating objects 391
RDBMSModel: Finding objects 394 G RDBMSModel: Removing
objects 395 G Conclusion 397
14.3 Summary 400
14.4 Additional reading 401
15 Middleware 402
15.1 Why distribute? 402
Communication 403 G Performance 404 G Economics (clustering/
fault-tolerance) 405 G Reliability (clustering/load-balancing) 406
15.2 Distributed object design vs. classic object design 406
Stateful vs. stateless 406
15.3 Technologies 410
Raw access: Sockets 411 G Java RPC: remote method invocation 412
Analysis 417 G RMI/JRMP 419 G Object Request Brokers:
CORBA 428 G Object Request Brokers: Distributed Component Object
Model 432 G Message-Oriented Middleware: JMS 433
Objects across the wire: Mobile objects 435 G Objects across
the wire: shared objects 441
15.4 Employee middleware models 448
RMI implementation 451 G JSDTModel: Shared-object
implementation 452 G Analysis 460
15.5 Additional reading 461
16 Java Native Interface 463
16.1 Java Native Interface 464
Native code on the server 465
16.2 JNI essentials 472
Java calling native 472 G Native calling Java 478
JNI invocation 484 G JNI changes in JDK 1.2 492
16.3 Other methods of Java-to-native interaction 494
Sockets 494 G CORBA 494
16.4 Integrating the server: GJAS goes native 495
Making GJAS an NT service 495 G Using NT IPC mechanisms:
Named pipe 496
16.5 Other JNI uses 506
Debugging support 506 G JVMDI 507 G JVMPI 508
16.6 Summary 508
16.7 Additional reading 508
17 Monitoring 510
17.1 Impotance grows 510
Liveness 511 G Notification 523
17.2 Summary 533
epilogue 535
index 547


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